May 7, 2018

The Magia Lee generation is upset about parking tickets

In Israel a sense of entitlement is known as "Magia Lee" - מגיע לי - I deserve it. I have it coming to me.

Despite the public being told to not drive their own cars to the north to get to Meron on Lag b'Omer but rather to rely on public transportation, many did anyway. Obviously they could not get into Meron or the surrounding parking lots, as those were all closed off to private cars and being used for buses and transport vehicles. Instead, many went to nearby Tzfat, found parking and walked or took a bus or hitched a ride or whatever to Meron.

The problem is that some/many of these people who parked their cars in Tzfat on their way to Meron parked in no parking zones, thinking that because of the holiday it would be ok and the city would not fine them. The city did publicize that it would not enforce paid parking during the Lag b'Omer celebrations.

Many people returned to their illegally parked cars after the celebrations only to discover a nice hefty parking ticket (250-500nis) waiting on the windshield.

And now they are livid, saying the City of Tzfat is anti-Haredi (as, after all, during the klezmer festival they do not do this) and they are looking into suing the city. The city's responseis that as they publicized they did not enforce paid parking and parking in "blue and white" spots was free. Illegal parking in no parking zones, "red and white" spots, parking on sidewalks and in bus zones, is what people got ticketed for.
source: Actualic

People parking illegally can be annoying and sometimes dangerous. Like any other law, if someone wants to take the risk of getting caught and fined or punished with whatever punishment is deserving, they can do whatever they want and then not complain when they get caught - pony up the price, and maybe it was worth it or maybe not. To do something illegal and then complain when getting caught is a symptom of the Magia Lee generation. Here they are saying I wanted to celebrate, needed to park so I have the right to park wherever I want and you do not have the right to tell me I cannot park there.







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17 comments:

  1. Reminds me of in NYC when alternate side parking is suspended, but meters are in effect.

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  2. Something I learned at work, where there is not sufficient parking. Parking in a designated parking spot (blue and white) without paying normally costs 100 Shekel.
    Parking in a no-parking area (red and white, bus stop, sidewalk, marked with a no parking sign [blue circle with red diagonal line] etc) is regarded as dangerous, can obstruct traffic, and hence gets a much larger fine (starting at around 250 shekel).

    Sounds like Tzfat was being very generous by making blue and white free, but given the narrows streets and difficult accessibility in some pars of Tzfat. I'm very glad to hear that they imposed a large fine on people who were blocking the street or similar.

    Question - were there designated parking areas outside Tzfat (or any other city) with Shuttles to Meron?

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    Replies
    1. I dont know details of what arrangements were made. I wasnt going so didnt pay attention. meron and tzfat are walking distance of each other, so even if not, people parked and might walk

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  3. I suppose when you're on your way to your עבודה זרה, parking illegally is a minor thing.

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    Replies
    1. Hmmm... and as well "What makes the residents of Modiin Ilit “frum”, never mind “frummer”?

      Or, if they are “frum”, I’d happily be Frei"

      This the same Avi who just claimed " To the extent that I demonize anyone, it's for what they do."!

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    2. iirc my family background is of those who feel dancing around a fire likely somewhat problematic

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    3. Do you have a point? Or are you just following me around quoting irrelevancies as a way to pass the time?

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    4. I don't care about your hashkafos, or Ms Cohen's hashkafos, but illogic rankles. IF the people going to Miron thought what they were doing was transgressive, then certainly other sins would be comparatively trivial. Devil worshipers sometimes honk in hospital zones. The point is that these people believe that what they do enhances their kedusha, and that they are doing good. This has nothing to do with illegal parking or breaking any other law enacted for the public good. By your "logic," Catholics going to Easter services should park illegally. I don't know who you are, but if you want to present your life choices as if they were the product of reason and not post facto rationalization, you would be well served by learning how to think more carefully.

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    5. personally I dont think one thing has anything to do with the other. they could have been going for devil worship or for the holy of holies. parking in an illegal zone is taking a risk of getting a ticket, and your intention of being in the area is irrelevant to the way you parked.

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    6. Catholics going to an Easter service are not violating their purported religion, whether or not they think so. I agree that in their minds, the fire worshippers are not doing anything wrong, and that I was writing from my perspective.

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  4. Chas vshalom Chas vchalilah really no need for such talk

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  5. Parking anywhere is a pain. I pay extra on my rent just to have a parking spot. And I bike anywhere I can just so I don’t have to move my car. I do get rankled when Hatzalah people illegally park to go Daven. The spaces they take are dangerous, and could cause a horrible accident-which they would need to park by C’V to respond to, lol!

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  6. Let's just point out that the vast majority of Israelis don't park illegally, and the vast majority of those who do and get tickets pay them without complaint. It's hardly fair to label an entire society (or generation) because of some entitled folk.

    But let's be honest here: A lot of these people are told that it's a fact of nature that just because of the community into which they were born, they have certain privileges over every other of their fellow Jews, and are exempt from certain of their responsibilities. What's a few hundred shekels compared to three years of your life?

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  7. We are in this world for the purpose of bringing Moshiach . That's all .(and I'm not Chabad)

    Many are out there and here (mouthing whatever ethics or piousness ) whose goals are ..very different
    And we have few working in whatever endeavor towards that goal

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  8. I know it's Israel, where the language is Hebrew, but I'm thinking in Yiddish...Es kumt tzu mir...

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    Replies
    1. A lot of modern Hebrew expressions come from Yiddish.

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  9. There was a show on the A&E Network called "Parking Wars" where the parking authority employees in various cities (ticket writers, tow trucks, booters, impound employees) were filmed and the candid reactions of citizens were recorded when interacting with the employees.

    Maybe the crews need to visit Tzfat on Lag B'Omer?

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